Curriculum

On this page you will find year overviews to download as well as detailed information for each topic.

Curriculum Overviews

Reception 2018-19 Year 6 2018-19 Year 5 2018-19 Year 4 2018-19 Year 3 2018-19 Year 2 2018-19 Year 1 2018-19 The curriculum and reading - Sep 2018

English

Our English curriculum underpins the Woodhouse curriculum. A high-quality education teaches pupils to speak, listen, read and write fluently so that they can communicate with others. All the skills of language are essential to participating fully as a member of society.

 

Speaking and listening: speak clearly using Standard English, justify ideas with reasons, ask questions to check understanding, develop vocabulary, give well-structured descriptions and explanations, hypothesise and explore ideas

 

Reading: read fluently, understand extended texts, read for pleasure

 

Writing: develop stamina and skills to write at length, with accurate spelling, punctuation and grammar

 

We believe that pupils' acquisition and understanding of vocabulary is paramount to their learning and progress across the whole curriculum. Pupils are encouraged to make links between known and new vocabulary thus enabling them to expand on these in their writing.

Literacy lessons include spelling, punctuation and grammar work, shared reading and writing experiences and opportunities to discuss and debate.

 

Reading

There are two dimensions to the teaching of reading; word reading (decoding and phonics) and comprehension (listening and reading). DARTS (Directed Activities Related to Texts) sessions are additional to Literacy lessons, enabling staff and pupils to read a range of fiction and non-fiction texts and engage in high quality discussions in small groups. 

In Year R, we use the 'Letters and Sounds' scheme of work which is a systematic synthetics phonic approach to reading and writing. The resources we use are mainly based around the Jolly Phonics scheme although resources and activities are adapted to suit the specific needs of pupils or year groups.

In Year R the reading scheme is mainly phonetic so the pupils are using and practising the skills they have been introduced to. The two main schemes used are Oxford Reading Tree and Rigby Star, these include simple captions, short stories, traditional tales and non-fiction texts.

The teaching of phonics continues throughout KS1 and decoding skills are taught alongside reading comprehension skills.  In KS2, where pupils' decoding skills are more advanced, there is more of a focus on developing children's comprehension skills. 

A reading scheme, which comprises of mainly Oxford Reading Tree books, runs throughout the school.  In the lower levels, some books focus on decoding whereas others focus on comprehension. The scheme provides pupils with the opportunity to read a broad range of fiction and non-fiction books. In Year 6, pupils take part in the Accelerated Reader scheme - a computer programme which helps monitor children's independent reading and comprehension.  After finishing their reading books, children take a quiz on a computer which provides them with instant feedback and motivation.

 

Writing

Similarly to reading, there are two dimensions to the teaching of writing: transcription (spelling and handwriting) and composition (articulating ideas and structuring them in speech and writing). Pupils are taught to form, articulate and communicate ideas and subsequently organise them with an awareness of the reader. Pupils are also taught to develop a fluent, legible and speedy handwriting style.

In addition to Literacy lessons, each week pupils in KS2 participate in a smaller group Guided Writing session with their class teacher in order to practise and refine their writing skills. These are also developed across the curriculum, where pupils will learn to write a variety of different text types, for a range of purposes and audiences.

 

Spelling, vocabulary and grammar

We teach our pupils to use standard English by combining all the elements of spelling, grammar and punctuation. Pupils learn correct grammatical terms and teachers exploit opportunities to enhance pupils' vocabulary across the whole curriculum.


Geography

Our curriculum for geography aims to inspire in pupils a curiosity about the world and its people. We aim to equip pupils with knowledge and understanding of the diversity of places, people, resources and environments. We believe that pupils should understand about the interaction between physical and human processes and how this leads to the formation of landscapes and environments.

We achieve this by developing skills linked to: locational knowledge; place knowledge; human and physical geography and developing geographical skills and field work

Lessons are taught using a cross-curricular approach, although some skills may be taught discretely should they not link to the cross curricular topics being taught. Cross-curricular themes with a strong geographical emphasis include: Holidays; Dressing up; Building a village; Rainforests; Moving people and Vacations

Pupils will be taught:

  • To use a range of resources to locate and identify cities, counties , countries and significant geographical terms
  • To compare and contrast a geographical region in the UK, Europe or a region within North and South America : e.g. Brighouse (and other areas in the UK); Spain; Germany; South America (rainforest regions)
  • To understand the key aspects of physical and human geography : e.g climate zones; rivers; mountains, settlements and land use; distribution of natural resources including energy, food, minerals (NB this list is not exhaustive)
  • To observe, measure and record the human and physical features in the local area

History

Our curriculum for history aims to inspire pupils' curiosity to know more about local, regional, national and international history. Pupils develop the chronological, enquiry and interpretation skills needed to understand the history of Britain and the wider world as a coherent narrative, from the earliest times to the present day. Pupils achieve this by asking perceptive questions, thinking critically, weighing evidence, sifting arguments, and developing perspective and judgement. Through learning about significant events and individuals from the past, pupils gain an understanding of the complexity of people's lives, the process of change, the diversity of societies and relationships between different groups, as well as their own identity and the challenges of their time.

Lessons are taught using a cross-curricular approach, although some skills may be taught discretely should they not link to the cross curricular topics being taught. Cross-curricular themes with a strong historical emphasis include: Holidays; Buildings; Celebrations; Transport; Around the World; Vikings; Chocolate; Circus; Monarchs; Romans; Moving People; Myths and Legends; The Luddites and Ancient Civilisations.

Pupils will be taught:

  • about changes within and beyond living memory which reflect aspects of change in national life, including those that are significant globally or nationally. As they progress into Key Stage Two, pupils will note connections, contrasts and trends over time, thus developing a chronologically secure knowledge and understanding of British, local and world history, establishing clear narratives within and across the periods they study.
  • about the lives of significant individuals in the past who have contributed to national and international achievements, such as: Philip Astley, Mary Seacole, Queen Victoria, Percy Shaw, the Wright Brothers, Alfred the Great, William the Conqueror, Henry VIII, Elizabeth I, Boudicca, James Brindley, Humphry Davy, Isambard Kingdom Brunel.
  • about significant historical events, such as: The Gunpowder Plot, The Great Fire of London, the Battle of Hastings, Roman Invasions and the Industrial Revolution.
  • to develop the appropriate use of historical terms relating to the passing of time.
  • to understand ways in which information about the past is represented, using a range of sources when addressing and sometimes devising historically valid questions about change, cause, similarity and difference, and significance.
  • to construct informed responses that involve thoughtful selection and organisation of relevant historical information.

Languages

Our curriculum for Languages aims to foster pupils' curiosity and deepen their understanding of the world. Pupils are encouraged to express their ideas and thoughts in another language and to understand and respond to it, both in speech and in writing. It also provides opportunities for them to communicate for practical purposes and learn new ways of thinking. Our curriculum provides the foundation for further language learning at secondary school.

Prior to the introduction of the new national curriculum in September 2014, a variety of languages have been taught including French, German, Spanish and Latin. The new national curriculum states that schools should focus on enabling pupils to make substantial progress in one language, therefore all pupils in Key Stage 2 will learn French.

In French lessons, pupils will be provided with a variety of learning experiences including exploring the patterns and sounds of language through songs and rhymes; asking and answering questions; watching video clips of native speakers; playing games; using a French dictionary and learning new vocabulary and grammar.


Maths

Our curriculum for maths recognises its importance to everyday life and how it links to science, technology, financial literacy and most forms of employment. We place great emphasis on number fluency , mathematical reasoning and problem solving.

Fluency: considering the meaning of an operation, recording work carefully, considering the reasonableness of an answer

Reasoning: following a line of enquiry, considering relationships between numbers, justifying answers, using correct mathematical language

Problem solving: using and applying maths to a variety of problems, breaking down problems into smaller steps and persevering in seeking solutions

We provide pupils with a variety of learning experiences which enable them to make connections and apply their mathematical knowledge across the curriculum. Lessons incorporate a mixture of activities to develop mental maths strategies, written methods and consolidation of these skills. In the reception classes, maths skills are taught in a variety of ways: discretely and integrated through focused activities in the outdoor and indoor learning space.

Pupils are taught a variety of strategies to become secure with number bonds and multiplication tables to 12. These skills are intrinsic for the development of the formal written methods of recording calculations. Pupils who grasp these are subsequently challenged through being offered more sophisticated problems to deepen their understanding. Pupils who are not sufficiently fluent with earlier concepts have additional practice and may be taught different strategies to enable them to move on.

I love school because I learn so much and it’s great fun

Year 1 Pupil


Music

Our curriculum for music aims to engage and inspire pupils to develop a love of music thus increasing self-confidence and creativity.

 As pupils move through the school, we aim to:

  • Listen to and evaluate a range of music across historical periods, genres and styles
  • create and compose both individually and in collaboration
  • understand how music is created and communicated and become familiar with musical terms: pitch, duration, tempo, timbre, texture and structure

Pupils will be taught:

  • to play and perform in soloand ensemble contexts
  • improvise and compose music for a range of purposes
  • appreciate a wide range of live and recorded music drawn for great composers and musicians such as Grieg, Saint-Saënsand Prokofiev, Gershwin, Wagner, Holst, The Beatles and Abba
  • to appreciate and understand a wide range music drawn from different traditions such as African drumming, pentatonic scales (music from China)

We endeavour to expose our pupils to a range of musical experiences through additional music opportunities such as choir, band and music tuition: music ensembles; singing at public events: Christmas Fayre, concerts, Rastrick High School, Big Sing.

Pupils are also able to partake in private music lessons provided by the peripatetic music Hub from the Local Authority for which there is a charge to parents.


Physical Education

Our high-quality physical education curriculum inspires pupils to succeed in a wide range of physically-demanding activities. Pupils are provided with a wealth of experiences as they progress through the school which enable them to build on their knowledge, skills and understanding of health and fitness. The school facilities enable pupils to engage in indoor, outdoor and swimming activities which build character and help to embed values such as fairness and respect.

 

The physical education curriculum aims to ensure that all pupils:

Develop competence to excel in a broad range of physical activities. Are physically active for sustained periods of time. Engage in competitive sports and activities. Lead healthy, active lives.

Year  1

Gymnastics: master basic movements including running, jumping, as well as developing balance and begin to apply these in a range of activities.

Games: participate in team games, developing simple skills, such as throwing and catching.

Dance: perform dances using simple movement patterns.

Swimming: enter and exit pool safely, increase confidence in the water and begin to use recognisable swimming strokes.

Year  2

Gymnastics: master basic movements including running, jumping, as well as developing balance, agility and co-ordination, and begin to apply these in a range of activities.

Games: participate in team games, developing simple tactics for attacking and defending.

Dance: create, edit and perform dances using a variety of levels and movement patterns.

Swimming: swim 5 metres on front and back (with or without aids). Push and glide using arms.

Learn basic water safety skills.

Year  3

Gymnastics: develop flexibility, strength, technique, control and balance.

Games: play competitive games, modified where appropriate for example, basketball, cricket, football, hockey, netball, rounders and tennis.

Dance:  create, edit and perform individual and small group dances using a variety of levels and movement patterns.

 

 

Swimming: swim 10 metres without aids on front and back. Perform tuck rotation and submerge to pick up objects.

Perform safe self-rescue in different water-based situations.

Year  4

Gymnastics: develop flexibility, strength, technique, control and balance. Create, edit and perform gymnastic sequences.

 

Games: play competitive games, modified where appropriate for example, basketball, cricket, football, hockey, netball, rounders and tennis, and apply basic principles suitable for attacking and defending.

Dance:  create, edit and perform individual and group dances using a variety of levels and movement patterns.

 

 

Swimming: swim 10 metres using a variety of strokes. Skull 5 metres head first and perform a sequence of 3 floats.

Perform age appropriate safe self-rescue in different water-based situations and complete a water safety session.

Year  5

Gymnastics: compare their performances with previous ones and demonstrate improvement to achieve their personal best.

Games: continue to play competitive games, applying basic principles suitable for attacking and defending.

Use running, jumping, throwing and catching in isolation and in combination.

Dance:  perform individual and group sequential dances using differing movement patterns.

Outdoor and adventurous activity: challenges both individually and within a team.(Rock climbing/caving)

Swimming: swim competently, confidently and proficiently over a distance of at least 25 metres.

Use a range of strokes effectively [for example, front crawl, backstroke and breaststroke.

Year 6

Gymnastics: create, edit, perform and compare their performances with previous ones and demonstrate improvement to achieve their personal best.

Games: Design team games, applying basic principles suitable for attacking and defending.

Use running, jumping, throwing and catching in isolation and in combination.

Dance:  perform individual and group sequential dances using differing movement patterns.

Outdoor and adventurous activity: challenges both individually and within a team.((Rock climbing/caving)

Residential: take part in outdoor and adventurous residential. (annually one week)

Swimming: swim competently, confidently and proficiently over a distance of at least 25 metres.

Use a range of strokes effectively [for example, front crawl, backstroke and breaststroke.


Art

Our curriculum for art and design aims to engage, inspire and challenge pupils thus equipping them with the knowledge and skills to experiment, invent and create their own works of art, craft and design. We use a range of artists, sculptors and designers such as Monet, Seurat, Goldsworthy, Hockney, Charles R Knight, Mark Hallet, Pollock, Henri Rousseau, Munch and Georgia O'Keefe for inspiration and aim to ensure that they understand how art and design both reflect and shape our history and contribute to the culture, creativity and wealth of society.

Pupils are provided with a wealth of experiences as they progress through the school which enable them to build on their knowledge, skills and understanding of art and design techniques such as drawing, painting, printing and sculpture.

Lessons are taught using a cross-curricular approach, although some skills may be taught discretely should they not link to the cross curricular topics being taught.

Pupils will be taught:

  • To use drawing, painting and sculpture to develop and share ideas, experiences and imagination
  • To record their observations and improve their mastery of art and design techniques
  • About great artists, craft makers and designers and make comparisons with their own work

Computing

Our curriculum for computing is designed to provide children with the skills they need to excel in the constantly developing technological world in which we live. It is a curriculum that continuously evolves in order to keep pace with the rapid advances in technology. Pupils have access to a range of hardware such as: laptops, netbooks, iPads, iPods and tablets, and software, such as: Scratch, Logo, Kodu, Pivot, Minecraft, iMovie, thus ensuring that they can apply computational thinking to a variety of devices and systems.

 

Lessons are taught using a cross-curricular approach, although some skills may be taught discretely should they not link to the cross curricular topics being taught. Information technology is used in lessons on a daily basis to enhance teaching and promote independent and collaborative learning. Pupils are encouraged to use computational thinking across all subjects, in the form of problem solving, logical planning and reasoning.

Pupils are taught to:

  • Think computationally whilst programming and coding
  • Understand and use algorithms
  • Solve problems and de-bug programs
  • Use technology to create pictures, presentations, animations and films
  • Use technology to connect and communicate with others in the school community and the wider world
  • Use technology to collect and interpret data
  • Become digitally literate in order to communicate effectively and evaluate digital content
  • Respect and understand technology, including the internet and how to stay safe online

Design & Technology

Our curriculum for design and technology aims to inspire and develop pupils' practical skills, creativity and imagination. Within a variety of contexts, pupils will be given the opportunity to design, make and evaluate products that solve real and relevant problems whilst acquiring a broad range of subject knowledge and drawing on wider related disciplines such as mathematics, science, engineering, computing and art.

Our annual 'Marketplace' event enables all pupils to enhance  and develop their skills and apply them in a practical purposeful manner. Pupils have planned, designed and sold a variety of products resulting in profit which have been spent on a variety of classroom resources of their choice.

Pupils in Key Stage 2 are taught how to cook and apply the principles of nutrition and healthy eating, thus instilling a love of cooking and enabling them to develop  crucial life skills.  

Lessons are taught using a cross-curricular approach, although some skills may be taught discretely should they not link to the cross curricular topics being taught.

Pupils will be taught:

  • To design purposeful, functional and appealing products based on design criteria and to develop their ideas through a variety of methods, e.g. templates, mock-ups, annotated drawings and computer-aided design
  • To select from and use a wide range of tools, equipment, materials and components
  • To investigate and analyse a range of existing products and use their findings to evaluate and modify their own work
  • To understand how key events and individuals in design and technology have helped shape the world
  • To apply their understanding of how to strengthen, stiffen and reinforce structures
  • To understand and use mechanical and electrical systems in their products
  • To prepare and cook a variety of predominantly savoury dishes using a range of cooking skills, techniques and seasonal ingredients

Personal, Social, Citizenship and Health Education

A bespoke PSCHE curriculum has been developed in response to promoting our pupils' spiritual, moral, social and cultural (SMSC) development and links closely to the school's values. Each year group learns about pertinent issues linking to the following:

 

Be Safe

To provide a caring, secure and nurturing environment where all can learn, work or play with confidence

Be United

To celebrate our social and cultural diversity so that everyone feels valued and respected

Be Caring

To respect and value ourselves and others in the community by displaying positive attitudes, pride in our school, appreciation of each other and challenging negative influences and behaviour

Be Bold

To provide learning experiences, both inside and outside the classroom, which promote and develop pupils’ independence and resilience

Be Healthy

To provide opportunities for pupils to develop healthy lifestyles and thereby promote physical, spiritual and emotional well – being

Be Creative

To offer a curriculum which is relevant and creative; promoting high quality learning which challenges  and develops  all our pupils’ talents and gifts  enabling  them to reach their full potential

We deliver a curriculum built on theme-based learning to enthuse and engage our children. This curriculum includes lots of shared talk and opportunities to carry out research.

Within the SMSC element of the curriculum, and covertly across many areas of school, we seek to promote the fundamental British values of democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty and mutual respect and tolerance of those with different faiths and beliefs. We aim to enable pupils to:

  • understand how they can influence decision- making through the process of democracy
  • appreciate that living under the rule of law protects individual citizens and is essential for well-being and safety
  • understand that the freedom to choose and hold other faiths and beliefs is protected in law
  • accept that other people may have different faiths or beliefs and this should be accepted and tolerated
  • understand the importance of identifying and dealing with discrimination

A variety of learning experiences are provided to maximise pupils' understanding and motivation to learn. These have included: 'marketplace' money-making challenge, Healthy Living Week, anti-bullying workshops, visits from external speakers, 'Living Eggs' project and a visit from a 'Pop-up farm.'

Some of the learning links to the Investors in Pupils standard for which the school was re-accredited in 2015.


Religious Education

Our curriculum for RE adheres to the statutory curriculum for maintained schools in Calderdale and is authorised by the Standing Advisory Council (SACRE).

The three aims of the curriculum are as follows:

  • Knowledge and understanding of a range of religions and other world views
  • Expression of ideas and insights around questions of beliefs and meaning
  • Investigation and response to important questions for individuals and the wider community

Teaching and learning will focus on the core religions: Christianity; Islam; Sikhism; Judaism; Buddhism and Hinduism whilst recognising diversity and the many other systems of belief. Lessons will follow an enquiry and investigative approach teaching pupils to articulate their personal beliefs whilst respecting the right of others to differ.

Year  1

Who is special to us?

How do Christians and Muslims celebrate new life

 How do we celebrate special occasions?

 Which books and stories are special?

Year  2

What does it mean to belong to a church or a mosque?

How can we make good choices?

How do people pray?

How can we work together to take care of our planet?

Year  3

What does it mean to be a Jew?

 

How are beliefs expressed through arts?

 

What do Christians believe about a good life?

 

What do creation stories tell us about our world?

 

Year  4

What faiths make up our community and how can we ensure that everyone belongs?

How do festivals use light as a symbol?

Who can inspire us?

What words of wisdom can guide us?

Year  5

Why are some places and journeys special?

What do Muslims believe about a good life?

Should we forgive others? 

 

What matters most to believers?

Year 6

What does it mean to be a Sikh?

Can charity change the world?

What is compassion?

What is important to Christians?


Science

Our curriculum for science aims to provide the foundations for understanding the natural and humanly constructed world by equipping pupils with the scientific knowledge and language required to understand the uses and implications of science today and for the future.   All pupils should be taught essential aspects of the knowledge, method, processes and uses of science.  Pupils are encouraged to develop a sense of excitement and curiosity alongside building up a body of key foundational knowledge and concepts.  As pupils move through the school, they are taught to explain what is occurring, predict how things will behave and analyse causes.

Pupils are provided with a wealth of experience as they progress through the school which enable them to build on their knowledge, skills and understanding of scientific processes such as: questioning, observing, grouping, classifying, comparing, communicating, testing and evaluating.

Lessons in Key Stage One  are taught using a cross-curricular approach, although some skills may be taught discretely should they not link to the cross curricular topics being taught. Topics covered include: Animals, including humans; use of everyday materials and seasonal changes.

In Key Stage Two, all skills are taught discretely with cross-curricular links as appropriate. Topics covered include: Forces and magnets; Living things and their habitats; Earth and Space, Animals, including humans and Evolution and inheritance

Pupils will be taught:

  • To plan different types of scientific enquiry which answer relevant questions, including recognising and controlling variables where necessary
  • To make systematic and careful observations
  • To take accurate measurements using a range of equipment such as thermometers and data loggers
  • To record data and results using: drawings, diagrams, labels, classification keys, tables, bar charts, scatter graphs, bar and line graphs
  • To use test results to make predictions which may lead to further comparative and fair testing
  • To identify differences, similarities and changes relating to scientific ideas and processes
  • To report and present findings from enquiries
  • To draw conclusions using scientific evidence

Woodhouse Values and British Values

The British Values of Democracy, Rule of Law, Individual Liberty, Mutual Respect and Tolerance of faiths and beliefs are extremely important to our school.

Democracy and Rule of Law

Throughout the year, we learn a lot about democracy and the rule of law through our school council elections, class council meetings and assemblies based upon the government and our Royal family.  

Individual Liberty

This is a particular focus in PSHCE and RE lessons but is also a thread that is woven through all other curriculum lessons where children are encouraged to have their own ideas and opinions and are encouraged to speak freely.

Mutual Respect

There are many ways in which respect is encouraged at Woodhouse. Our ‘Buddying’ system helps children to get to know other pupils from different year groups. Our PSHCE value ‘Be United’ and ‘Be Caring’ focus on bringing the school together as a family and looking after each other. The school’s Web Sheriffs ensure that respect extends to the online world too.

Tolerance of faiths and beliefs

Whilst this is at the heart of all of our RE lessons, it is also highlighted and encouraged through assemblies focused on celebrations such as: Eid, Christmas, Easter, Harvest, World Religion Day, Diwali etc. In Year 2, pupils visit the local church and mosque. In Year 4, there is an annual visit to the Gurdwara. In Reception, where the curriculum is planned around the children’s interests, parents are regularly invited into school to share their beliefs and values with the children.