Maths Curriculum

At Woodhouse Primary School we encourage our pupils to be confident, resilient mathematicians with a love of learning and no fear of ‘grappling’ with difficult concepts and those expressed in an unfamiliar way. In our school, children are scaffolded, extended and supported through rapid teacher intervention, use of equipment and choice of strategies e.g. jottings/mental/resources. As such, teaching is both enabling and extending

We aim that all pupils:

  • Become fluent in the fundamentals of mathematics so that they develop the conceptual as well as procedural understanding that underpins a concept and the ability to recall and apply knowledge rapidly and accurately.
  • Can reason mathematically by following a line of enquiry and develop and present a justification, argument or proof using mathematical language.
  • Can solve problems by applying their mathematics to a variety of problems with increasing sophistication, including unfamiliar contexts and real-life scenarios.
  • Can use the language of mathematics accurately discussing their learning with confidence and precision.

In mathematics lessons you will see:

  • Teachers and children having fun and demonstrating positive ‘can do’ attitudes.
  • High expectations of learning where ALL children are challenged and ‘grappling’ with concepts; they will demonstrate resilience and independence.
  • Insistence on mathematical terminology being used accurately and confidently to explain learning and understanding.
  • Children confidently using resources from around the classroom to support their learning.
  • Well-designed lessons to build upon previous learning to help learners to remember in the long term. g. repetition of stem sentences for ‘sticky knowledge’; small steps; layered learning to enable and extend.
  • Timely and rapid interventions to address misconceptions.
  • Effective questioning where teachers adapt learning within the lesson to support the progress of all learners.
  • Application of skills to non-standard situations including the use of non-examples to challenge thinking.

Our definition of mastery:

Mastery is not just being able to memorise key facts and procedures. Mastery of the curriculum requires that all pupils:

  • use mathematical concepts, facts and procedures appropriately, flexibly and fluently;
  • recall key number facts with speed and accuracy and use them to calculate and work outunknown facts;
  • have sufficient depth of knowledge and understanding to reason and explain mathematical concepts and procedures and use them to solve a variety of problems.

Developing mastery with greater depth is characterised by pupils’ ability to:

  • solve problems of greater complexity (i.e. where the approach is not immediately   obvious), demonstrating creativity and imagination;
  • independently explore and investigate mathematical contexts and structures;
  • communicate results clearly and systematically explain and generalise the mathematics.

In order to ensure progression we use the maps which have been produced by the National Centre for Excellence in the Teaching of Mathematics (NCETM). The maps are structured and divided into sub categories to illustrate progression in key areas. Some statements appear twice and this is because the objectives have central relevance to more than one maths topic. This embraces our aim that pupils should make rich connections across mathematical ideas to develop fluency, mathematical reasoning and competence in solving increasingly sophisticated problems.

Bespoke progression documents for specific key areas also ensure that teachers are able to plan learning opportunities which enable pupils to transfer, build upon and deepen their knowledge and understanding.

Cohort overviews are the working documents that teachers use to plan. These are working documents and are adapted in response to pupils’ outcomes.


Progression Maps

Map Statistics Geometry position direction and movement Geometry properties of shapes Measurement Map Algebra Map Ratio and Proportion Map Fractions Multiplication and Division Addition and Subtraction Place Value

The following are bespoke progression maps created by the school based on those above from NCETM.


Maths Overviews

Maths Curriculum Overview Reception Maths Curriculum Overview Year 1 Maths Curriculum Overview Year 2 Maths Curriculum Overview Year 3 Maths Curriculum Overview Year 4 Maths Curriculum Overview Year 5 Maths Curriculum Overview Year 6

Area and Perimeter Progression

 

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

Year 6

Area , Perimeter and Volume

Measure the perimeter of simple 2D shapes

Find the area of rectilinear

shapes by counting squares.

Measure and calculate the perimeter of composite rectilinear shapes in cm and m.

 

Recognise that shapes with the same areas can have different perimeters and vice versa.

 

 

 

Convert between different units of measure eg kilometre to metre.

 

Calculate and compare the area of rectangles (including squares), and including using standard units, cm2, m2 estimate the area of irregular shapes.

Recognise when it is possible to use formulae for area and volume of shapes.

 

 

 

Measure and calculate the perimeter of a rectilinear figure (including squares) in cm and m

Estimate volume (for example using 1cm3 blocks to build cuboids (including cubes) and capacity (for example, using water)).

 

Calculate the area of parallelograms and triangles.

 

 

 

Measure and calculate the perimeter of a rectilinear figure (including squares) in centimetres and metres.

Convert between different units of measure [for example, kilometre to metre]

Find the area of rectilinear shapes by counting squares.

 

Calculate, estimate and compare volume of cubes and cuboids using standard units, including cm3, m3 and extending to other units (mm3, km3).


Length, Capacity and Weight Progression

Measures:

Length

height

weight

capacity

Compare, describe and solve practical problems for: lengths and heights for example, long/short, longer/shorter, tall/short, double/half

 

Choose and use appropriate standard units to estimate and measure length/height in any direction (m/cm) and mass (kg/g) to the nearest appropriate unit, using rulers and scales.

Measure, compare, add and subtract: lengths (m/cm/mm).

 

Convert between different units of measurement ( for example kilometre to metre; hour to minute)

Convert between different units of metric measure (for example, km and m; cm and m; cm and mm; g and kg; l and ml).

 

Convert between miles and kilometres.

 

 

Compare, describe and solve practical problems for mass/weight [for example, heavy/light, heavier than, lighter than]; capacity and volume [for example, full/empty, more than, less than, half, half full, quarter]

Compare and order length and mass and record the results using >, < and =.

Solve problems, including missing number problems, using number facts, place value, and more complex addition and subtraction.

 

 

Understand and use approximate equivalences between metric units and common imperial units such as inches, pounds and pints.

 

 

Measure and begin to record lengths and heights,

mass/weight, capacity and volume.

 

Choose and use appropriate standard units to estimate and measure capacity (l/ml) and temperature (oC) to the nearest appropriate unit, using thermometers and measuring vessels.

 

Continue to measure using the appropriate tools and units, progressing to using a wider range of measures, including comparing and using mixed and simple equivalents of mixed units.

 

 

 

 

 

Compare and order volume/capacity & record the results using >, < and =.

Measure, compare, add and subtract: lengths (m/cm/mm); mass (kg/g); volume/capacity (l/ml).

 

 

 

 

 

 

Solve problems, including missing number problems, using number facts, place value, and more complex addition and subtraction.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Continue to measure using the appropriate tools and units, progressing to using a wider range of measures, including comparing and using mixed units (for example, 1kg and 200g) and simple equivalents of mixed units (for example, 5m = 500cm).

 

 

 


Money

 

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5

Money

Recognise and know the value of different denominations of coins and notes.

 

Recognise and use symbols of pounds (£) and pence (p); combine amounts to make a particular value.

 

add and subtract amounts of money to give change, using both £ and p in practical contexts

Solve simple measure and money problems involving fractions and decimals to two decimal places.

 

understand and use approximate equivalences between metric units and common imperial units such as inches, pounds and pints

 

Solve one step problems that involve addition and subtraction, using concrete objects and pictorial representations, and missing number problems.

 

Find different combinations of coins that equal the same amounts of money.

 

 

Estimate, compare and calculate different measures, including money in pounds and pence.

use all four operations to solve problems involving measure [for example, length, mass, volume, money] using decimal notation, including scaling.

 

 

Solve simple problems in a practical context involving addition and subtraction of money of the same unit, including giving change.

 

 

 


Time

 

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Year 4

Year 5/6

Time

Tell the time to the hour and half past the hour and draw the hands on a clock face to show these times.

Tell and write the time to five minutes, including quarter past/to the hour and draw the hands on a clock face to show these times.

Tell and write the time from an analogue clock, including using Roman numerals, 12-hour and 24-hour clocks.

Convert between different units of measure,

e.g. hour to minute.

 

Complete, read and interpret information in tables including timetables.

( statistics )

 

Recognise and use language relating to dates, including days of the week, weeks, months and years.

Know the number of minutes in an hour & the number of hours in a day.

 

Estimate and read time with increasing accuracy to the nearest minute.

 

Read, write & convert time between analogue and digital 12 and 24 hour clocks.

 

 

Compare, describe and solve practical problems for time [for example, quicker, slower, earlier, later] and measure and begin to record time (hours, minutes, seconds)

Compare and sequence intervals of time.

Record and compare time in terms of seconds, minutes and hours.

 

Solve problems involving converting from hours to minutes; minutes to seconds; years to months; weeks to days.

 

 

Sequence events in chronological order using language [for example, before and after, next, first, today, yesterday, tomorrow, morning, afternoon and evening.

 

Use vocabulary such as o’clock, am/pm, morning, afternoon, noon and midnight.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Know the number of seconds in a minute and the number of days in each month, year and leap year.

 

 

 

 

 

Compare durations of events [for example calculate the time taken by particular events or tasks].